Church Commissioners’ answers: pay, employment, security

On the 3rd, 6th, 7th and 8th February 2017 the Second Church Estates Commisisoner, Rt Hon Dame Caroline Spelman MP, answered a number of written questions from Labour MP Jon Trickett, about pay, employment and office facilities for the Church Commissioners and National Church Institutions:

Caroline SpelmanJon Trickett (Hemsworth): To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what the (a) level of earnings is of the (i) highest and (ii) lowest-paid employee and (b) median earnings are of employees of the Church Commissioners.

Dame Caroline Spelman: The National Church Institutions (NCIs) of the Church of England are made up of five charities which employ staff through a common employment scheme. Information about the pay of members of the NCIs is published in the NCIs annual reports. The Church Commissioners annual report is laid before Parliament and is available in the House of Commons Library.

The NCIs have two different employment strands: the Church Commissioners Institutional Investment Specialists and the NCI Common Employment Scheme.

The 33 staff of the Church Commissioners Institutional Investment Specialists are paid benchmarked salaries against other institutional investment specialists.

i) Highest total earnings are £465,584 and include an element of long term incentive payments, which pays based on consistent out-performance of the Commissioners’ target investment return over a sustained period of five years.
ii) Lowest total earnings are £29,359
iii) Median is £75,050

The NCI Common Employment Scheme covers all other staff directly employed by the NCIs. Outside of the Church Commissioners Investments team, 449 people, have pay managed on a consistent policy, based on job bands. We assess pay levels against other public and third sector employers.

i) Highest total earnings are £170,239
ii) Lowest earnings are £17,632
iii) Median earnings are £38,386.

Those staff on apprenticeships, internships or training schemes are outside of this pay structure and paid at least national minimum wage.

(via Parliament.uk)


Jon Trickett (Hemsworth): To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what the (a) ethnicity, (b) gender, (c) disability status, (d) educational background and (e) socio-economic status is of the three most senior officials of the Church Commissioners.

Dame Caroline Spelman: The three most senior office holders of the Church Commissioners are the First Church Estates Commissioner (Crown Appointment), the Second Church Estates Commissioner (Crown Appointment recommended by Government) and the Third Church Estates Commissioner (Appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury). This information is published on the website of the Church Commissioners (https://www.churchofengland.org/about-us/structure/churchcommissioners/commissioners.aspx) and in the annual report. A copy of the annual report is placed in the House of Commons Library as a matter of public record. The holders of the positions are officeholders, not employees. The National Church Institutions do not hold other demographic data.

(via Parliament.uk)


Jon Trickett (Hemsworth): To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what the total pay bill was for (a) male and (b) female employees in the Church Commissioners in 2015-16; and what the per capita spend from that pay bill for each man and woman was in that year.

Dame Caroline Spelman: The Church Commissioners have two different employment strands: one for the investments team and one for all other Commissioners’ staff. The total and per capita pay bill spends for men and women in the 2016 calendar year were:

Staff (excluding investment team):
Total paybill (gross earnings): £5,873,188
Male: £3,719,955; per capita (average) £82,666
Female: £2,153,233; per capita (average): £52,518

Investments team:
Total paybill (gross earnings): £3,610,872
Male: £2,387,023; per capita (average) £119,351
Female: £1,223,849; per capita (average): £94,142

(via Parliament.uk)


Jon Trickett (Hemsworth): To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, which persons not employed by the Church Commissioners hold security passes entitling them to enter the Church Commissioners premises.

Dame Caroline Spelman: The security arrangements at Church House in Westminster ensure that employees of the National Church Institutions (NCIs) have full access to those premises whilst others who may need temporary or limited access are able to enter only those parts of the building that they need to access for their work. The system has recently been upgraded to ensure that the NCIs provides a safe environment for staff and visitors.

(via Parliament.uk)


Jon Trickett (Hemsworth): To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, how many security passes into the Church Commissioners are issued to people (a) not directly employed by and (b) who are not civil servants who work in the Church Commissioners.

Dame Caroline Spelman: Most of the people who work at Church House, Westminster are not employed solely by the Church Commissioners. Staff of the National Church Institutions (NCIs) which include the Church Commissioners are mostly employed jointly by the Institutions.
In that context I refer the Hon Gentleman to my previous answer to question 62530 answered on 06 February 2017 [above] which stated that only NCI employees enjoy full access to our premises and that other groups have limited and time-limited access. These groups include diocesan bishops, members of General Synod, contractors and tenants.

A) To date the percentage of passes issued to NCIs staff is 56.24%
B) None of the staff of the NCIs are civil servants.

(via Parliament.uk)