Week in Westminster, 12th – 16th March 2018

This week in the House of Lords the Bishop of Lincoln delivered his maiden speech during a debate on the economy. Bishops spoke on the economy and asked questions about hate speech online, attacks on Muslims, child sexual exploitation scandals, the Government’s integration strategy, child hunger and school meals, Jerusalem and the Church Lands Bill, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

In the House of Commons the Second Church Estates Commissioner answered questions on wi-fi and broadband and use of church buildings.

The Bishop of Newcastle was on duty in the Lords throughout the week, reading prayers at the start of each sitting day.


Monday 12th March

The Bishop of Durham received responses to written questions on accommodation for asylum seekers.


Tuesday 13th March

Dame Caroline Spelman MP answered a question about wi-fi and broadband and church buildings, and another about the same in Blackburn diocese,

The Bishop of Oxford asked Government to affirm the Muslim communities’ condemnation of child sexual ​exploitation scandals.

The Bishop of Newcastle expressed support for Muslim communities experiencing hate crime.


 

Wednesday 14th March

The Bishop of Durham received a response to a written questions on school meals for children in poverty

The Bishop of Newcastle asked Government about proposals to tackle child hunger.


Thursday 15th March

The Bishop of Southwark received answers to six questions on Jerusalem, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and the Church Lands Bill.

The Bishop of Gloucester asked a question she had tabled to Government on online hate speech.

 

The Bishop of Portsmouth welcomed the Government integration strategy and raised concern about Near Neighbours funding.

 

The Bishop of Lincoln delivered his maiden speech during a debate on the economy. The Bishop of Portsmouth also spoke in the same debate, raising the plight of those struggling to make ends meet.


Friday 16th March

No contributions were made. The House of Lords did not sit.