Forced marriage – Bishop of St Albans asks Government about scale of problem

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On 24th July 2015 the Bishop of St Albans, Rt Revd Alan Smith, received answers to three written questions on forced marriage.

Bishop of St AlbansThe Lord Bishop of St Albans: To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many cases the Forced Marriage Unit was involved in, or gave support and advice to, in 2014.

Baroness Anelay of St Johns: The Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) provides a range of support and assistance in cases where British nationals are at risk of forced marriage in the UK or overseas. In 2014, the FMU gave advice or support related to a possible forced marriage in 1267 cases.

(via Parliament.uk)


The Lord Bishop of St Albans: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of how many British girls were sent abroad to marry in 2014.

 Baroness Anelay of St Johns: Not all forced marriage cases are reported to the British Government’s Forced Marriage Unit (FMU), which makes it impossible to make an accurate assessment on how many British girls may have been sent abroad to marry.

British girls may be sent abroad to marry with their full consent in the form of an arranged marriage. If the girl does not have the right to say no this becomes a forced marriage. The UK is a world leader in tackling forced (and early) marriage. It is child abuse, domestic abuse and a form of violence against women and men and a serious abuse of human rights.

The FMU dealt with 1267 cases in 2014. 77% of cases dealt with by the FMU in 2014 involve an overseas element, which means the victim is at risk of, or has been, taken overseas.

The number of cases the FMU deals with does not represent the number of British girls (and boys) being sent overseas for a forced marriage, but the number of calls and emails initiating contact with the FMU about a victim or potential victim.

(via Parliament.uk)


The Lord Bishop of St Albans: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of how many underage British girls were sent abroad to marry in 2014.

 Baroness Anelay of St Johns:  Not all forced marriage cases are reported to the British Government’s Forced Marriage Unit (FMU), which makes it impossible to make an accurate assessment on how many underage British girls may have been sent abroad to marry.

The UK is a world leader in tackling forced (and early) marriage. It is child abuse, domestic abuse and a form of violence against women and men and a serious abuse of human rights.

The FMU dealt with 1267 cases in 2014. 77% of cases dealt with by the FMU in 2014 involve an overseas element, which means the victim is at risk of, or has been, taken overseas.

In 22% of cases dealt with by the FMU in 2014 the victim was under 18 years old. The number of cases the FMU deals with does not represent the number of underage British girls (and boys) being sent overseas for a forced marriage, but the number of calls and emails initiating contact with the FMU about a victim or potential victim.

(via Parliament.uk)