Bishop of Carlisle asks if Nigerian Government can be asked how Fulani herders are getting weaponry

On 6th December 2018 Baroness Cox asked Her Majesty’s Government “whether they plan to revise their assessment of the situation in northern and central belt states of Nigeria, following the report by local church leaders of the killing and maiming of 6,000 civilians by Fulani Islamist terrorists between January and June and figures from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees that almost two million people have been displaced by jihadist attacks.” The Bishop of Carlisle, Rt Revd James Newcome, asked a follow-up question:

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, this violence is clearly organised and systematic. Will Her Majesty’s Government ask the Government of Nigeria to make available information regarding the sources and provision of sophisticated weaponry to the Fulani herders? Continue reading “Bishop of Carlisle asks if Nigerian Government can be asked how Fulani herders are getting weaponry”

Bishop of Carlisle asks Government about greening of towns and cities

On 5th December 2018 Baroness Randerson asked Her Majesty’s Government “what steps they are taking to raise awareness among the general public of the health impacts of emissions from diesel vehicles.” The Bishop of Carlisle, Rt Revd James Newcome, asked a follow-up question:

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, does the Minister agree that, while electric cars are being developed, trees, plants, shrubs and especially hedges can make a very useful contribution to the absorption of harmful emissions, as well as having a therapeutic value for those who grow them and those who enjoy them? Can he tell us of any plans the Government may have to encourage the greening of our towns and cities? Continue reading “Bishop of Carlisle asks Government about greening of towns and cities”

Bishop of Carlisle says more should be done to encourage voluntarily organ donation before moving to an opt-out system

Carlisle141217bOn the 23rd November 2018 the Bishop of Carlisle, the Rt Revd James Newcome spoke in the second reading debate of the Organ Donation (Deemed Consent) Bill. The Bishop supported the intentions behind the Bill, but pressed for more action first to increase voluntary donations, including engaging the BAME community, increasing specialist nurses and supporting potential donors though creation of a transplant pathway.

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, the Church of England is wholly committed to both the principle and the practice of organ donation, believing as it does that giving oneself and one’s possessions voluntarily for the well-being of others and without compulsion is a Christian duty and that organ donation is a striking example of that.

Continue reading “Bishop of Carlisle says more should be done to encourage voluntarily organ donation before moving to an opt-out system”

In debate on NHS at 70 Bishop of Carlisle highlights importance of public health and spiritual care

On 5th July 2018 Lord Darzi of Denham led a debate to mark the 70th anniversary of the NHS, “That this House takes note of the creation of the National Health Service in 1948, and the case for integration of health, mental health, social and community care to equip the National Health Service for the next 70 years.” The Bishop of Carlisle, Rt Revd James Newcome, who is the lead bishop for healthcare, spoke in the debate:

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, I too am most grateful to the noble Lord, Lord Darzi, for securing this timely debate. On the one hand, I am grateful because it is an opportunity to recall and be thankful for the establishment of the NHS in 1948 as one part of a comprehensive vision of social welfare—which, incidentally, owed much to the insight and energy of Archbishop William Temple and other Christian thinkers and activists. Temple and Beveridge were close friends, and much of the post-World War II vision that led to the creation of the welfare state by Bevan and others emerged from church-led consultations. Continue reading “In debate on NHS at 70 Bishop of Carlisle highlights importance of public health and spiritual care”

Bishop of Carlisle welcomes progress made under Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme

On 7th June 2018 Lord Scriven led a debate in the House of Lords on the motion ‘that this House takes note of the report of the Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration, An Inspection of the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme.’ The Bishop of Carlisle, Rt Revd James Newcome, spoke in the debate:

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Scriven, for securing this debate. I also extend my thanks to the inspectors for their helpful report. While I am about it, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Ramsbotham, for his kind words.

Most of all, I thank all those who have contributed to the good aspects of the vulnerable persons resettlement scheme thus far: Home Office officials, particularly the resettlement, asylum support and integration directorate; local authorities and devolved Administrations; refugee charities, and, not least, faith and community groups who have played their part in offering a very warm welcome. Expanding our resettlement offer from 750 people a year to the number under VPRS has required compassion, courage and not a small degree of competence. Continue reading “Bishop of Carlisle welcomes progress made under Syrian Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme”

Bishop of Carlisle asks Government about access to treatment for leukaemia patients

On 7th June 2018 Lord Forsyth of Drumlean asked Her Majesty’s Government “what plans they have to ensure that clinicians in England are able to treat chronic lymphocytic leukaemia by prescribing Ibrutinib in accordance with NICE guidelines.” The Bishop of Carlisle, Rt Revd James Newcome, asked a follow-up question:

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, I am most grateful to the Minister for meeting some of the patients suffering from this terrible disease. Can he tell us whether anyone directly affected by blood cancer was consulted before the initial decision was made by NHS England to restrict access to Ibrutinib? Can he assure the House that NICE guidelines will not often be varied—and then only after consultation with patients? Continue reading “Bishop of Carlisle asks Government about access to treatment for leukaemia patients”

Bishop of Carlisle asks about SEN funding for small schools

Carlisle141217bOn 4th June 2018 Lord Storey  asked Her Majesty’s Government “what assessment they have made of the impact of education, health and care plans on children with special educational needs.” The Bishop of Carlisle, the Rt Revd James Newcome, asked a follow up question:

The Lord Bishop of Carlisle: My Lords, in Cumbria where I live, a huge proportion of schools are classified as small and are often very small. Their funding, especially for children with special educational needs, is greatly limited by their ability to access economies of scale. Does the Minister agree that in smaller schools educational outcomes can at present be disproportionately affected by current funding models? Continue reading “Bishop of Carlisle asks about SEN funding for small schools”