Bishop of Ripon and Leeds calls for positive vision for role of police in serving the common good

“The College of Policing would do well to get on to the front foot in its ethical work so that our police see it as their duty not simply to avoid wrongdoing but to pursue values that will make them still more a force for the common good” – Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, 28/11/13

On 28th November 2013, the Bishop of Ripon and Leeds, the Rt Revd John Packer, took part in Lord Paddick’s take-note debate on public trust in the police, its role in effective policing, and the system for investigating complaints into police conduct. In his speech, the Bishop spoke of the importance of trust in fostering positive relationships between police and communities, and welcomed the College of Policing’s draft code of ethics, whilst calling for it to be bolder in its promotion of a positive role for the police in promoting the common good.

R_LThe Lord Bishop of Ripon and Leeds: My Lords, I, too, am grateful to the noble Lord, Lord Paddick, both for leading this debate and for his powerful and serious introduction to it. I also look forward to the first of many contributions to the work of this House from the noble Baroness, Lady Jones of Moulsecoomb.

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Bishop of Wakefield – EU Justice and Home Affairs measures (Written Answer)

On 5th August 2013, the Bishop of Wakefield, the Rt Revd Stephen Platten, received an answer to a written question on European Union Justice and Home Affairs measures.

Bishop of Wakefield PlattenThe Lord Bishop of Wakefield: To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, prior to their decision on 9 July to opt out of 130 European Union Justice and Home Affairs measures as provided for by the Lisbon Treaty, guarantees were provided by the European Commission that the United Kingdom would be able to opt back in to various police and justice provisions.

The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice (Lord McNally): Protocol 36 to the Treaties places an obligation on the UK and the Union institutions to, “…seek to re-establish the widest possible measure of participation of the United Kingdom in the acquis of the Union in the area of freedom, security and justice without seriously affecting practical operability of the various parts thereof, while respecting their coherence”. We are confident that we will be able to reach agreement on a sensible final package of measures that the UK will formally apply to rejoin.

Of course it is not possible to predict the final outcome of the discussions with EU institutions, but following the Governments announcement on 9 July the Commission made clear in a press release that it “respects the UK Government’s choice to opt out, which is in line with the Treaty, and welcomes the UK intention to also opt back into certain measures”.

(via Parliament.uk)

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